US SQUASH

Carter Fergusson, the Cal Ripken of Squash, Dies

In October 2014 US Squash recognized Carter Fergusson’s extraordinary consistency by renaming an important award in his honor.

A. Carter Fergusson died last weekend at the age of ninety-three.

Fergusson famously played in sixty-two consecutive National Singles tournaments. From 1948 through 2009, he participating in either the team, in the open or in a masters draw at the Nationals. He ended his streak in 2009 at the age of eighty-eight.

Introduced to the game at Haverford School in the late 1930s, Fergusson led Yale to two national championships, including in 1947 when he went 13-0 at number one on the ladder. He was inducted into the College Squash Association Hall of Fame in 1994.

In 1948, he played number one on the five-man Philadelphia team at his first National Singles in Boston. In the finals, with the overall match tied at 2-2, he won the decisive No.1 match, upsetting the defending champions Detroit. He went on to win numerous tournaments, including the Pennsylvania States, the Woodruff-Nee and the DeForest-Tyler and was ranked as high as No.3 in the nation.

Fergusson was an active squash administrator. He was the president of Merion Cricket Club (1976-79) and the U.S. Jesters (1967-70) and was USA Representative of the Jesters from 2006 until his death. He was the longtime chair of US Squash’s endowment committee and ranking committee and was a member of numerous other committees including nominating. One of the last of the pre-Second World War squash players, Fergusson was a friend to many generations of players.

Fergusson worked for his family’s company, Alex C. Fergusson, a textile, tanning and soap supply firm. He is survived by his wife Dudy and their three daughters, six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

In October 2014 US Squash recognized Carter Fergusson’s extraordinary consistency by renaming an important award in his honor. The A. Carter Fergusson Grand Master Honor Roll, celebrating a lifetime of contributions and accomplishments in squash, will, in perpetuity, recognize his tremendous legacy.

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