US SQUASH

Policies

Abuse, Harassment, Bullying and Hazing Policy

US Squash Abuse, Harassment, Bullying, and Hazing Policy

The United States Squash Racquets Association (“US Squash”) is committed to providing a safe environment for its members, participants, coaches, officials and volunteers, and has also made the commitment to uphold the values proposed by the U.S. Olympic Committee’s SafeSport Initiative. Sexual, physical or emotional abuse, harassment, bullying, or hazing in any form by any US Squash members, participants, coaches, officials and volunteers is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. When any members, participants, coaches, officials, staff and volunteers are subjected to sexual, physical or emotional abuse, harassment, bullying, or hazing in any form, it undermines the mission and values of US Squash. US Squash advocates build strong self-images among the youth participants, strive to promote good sportsmanship throughout the organization and encourage qualities of mutual respect, courtesy and tolerance.

All members of the organization, as well as parents, spectators and other invitees are expected to observe and adhere to the following principles.

  1. Physical and sexual abuse, including, but not limited to, striking, hitting, kicking, biting or wanton gesturing, lewd remarks, indecent exposure, unwanted physical contact, any form of sexual contact or inappropriate touching, are strictly prohibited within the organization and as a part of its events and activities Physical abuse does not include physical contact that is reasonably designed to coach, teach or demonstrate a squash skill. It also includes any act or conduct described as physical abuse, sexual abuse, or misconduct under federal or state law (e.g., child abuse, child neglect, assault, sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, and rape).
  1. Child sexual abuse involves any sexual activity with a child where consent is not or cannot be given. This includes sexual contact with a child accomplished by deception, manipulation, force or threat of force, regardless of the age of the participants. It also includes all sexual interaction between an adult and a child, regardless of whether there is deception or the child understands the sexual nature of the activity.
  1. Emotional or verbal abuse is prohibited and may include, but is not limited to: yelling, insulting, threatening, mocking, demeaning behavior or making abusive statements in regard to a person’s race, gender, religion, nationality/ethnicity, sex or age.  This may incorporate electronic communication via social media or online sources. Emotional abuse does not include controlled and disciplined verbal communication that is generally accepted in sports as a reasonable method of coaching or teaching the sport.
  1. Harassment is a repeated pattern of physical and/or non-physical behavior intended to cause fear, humiliation or annoyance, offend or degrade, create a hostile environment; or reflect discriminatory bias in an attempt to establish dominance, superiority or power over an individual athlete or group based on gender, race, ethnicity, culture, religion, sexual orientation, gender expression or mental or physical disability. It includes any act or conduct described as harassment under federal or state law. US Squash does not accept physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse, harassment or similar misconduct from any person towards athletes, staff, coaches, officials, volunteers, parents, spectators or any other persons while they are participating in or preparing for events or activities conducted under the protection and support of US Squash.
  1. Bullying is an intentional, persistent and repeated pattern of committing or willfully tolerating physical and non-physical behavior that is intended, or has the reasonable potential, to cause fear, humiliation or physical harm in an attempt to socially exclude, diminish or isolate the targeted athlete(s) as a condition of membership. It includes any act or conduct described a bullying under federal or state law.  This includes using electronic communications, social media, or other technology to harass, frighten, intimidate or humiliate (“cyber bulling”).
  1. Hazing involves coercing, requiring, forcing or willfully tolerating any humiliating, unwelcome or dangerous activity that serves as a condition for joining a group or being socially accepted by a group’s members.  It includes any act or conduct described as hazing under federal or state law. Activities that fit the definition of hazing are considered to be hazing regardless of an athlete’s willingness to cooperate or participate.

US Squash recommends taking the following precautions to help ensure a safe environment for all members, staff, volunteers, coaches, officials, and participants.

  1. Encourage parents to become as active as possible in sponsored activities, practices and other events. The more the parents are involved, the less likely it is for abusive situations to develop.
  1. We strongly advise that no adult person allow him/herself to be alone with a child or with any group of children in a private setting during or while they are participating in sponsored activities of US Squash. In particular, in such circumstances, we recommend that coaches or other adult members of the organization:

–     Do not drive alone with a child participant in the car.
–     Do not take a child alone to the locker room, bathrooms, or any other private room.
–     Provide one-on-one training or individual coaching with the assistance of another adult or athlete.
–     Have private conversations with youth participants within view of others instead of a private office.
–     Do not socialize individually with the participants outside of sponsored activities.

  1. When traveling overnight with youth participants, children should be paired up with other children of the same gender and similar age group, with chaperons in separate but nearby rooms.
  1. Harassment and abuse are defined in various sources such as state law, case law, sports organization and professional association codes of conduct and training manuals, corporate and business workplace documents and human right commission materials.  US Squash has not adopted any specific definition of harassment or abuse, choosing instead to defer to such general sources and definition for reference and application, depending on the circumstances. As further elaboration of examples given above, the following generally describe conduct that may be considered harassment or abuse:

a. Any improper or inappropriate comment, action or gesture directed toward a person or group that is related to race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability of other personal characteristic.
b. Creating an environment through behavior or course of conduct that is insulting, intimidating, humiliating, demeaning or offensive.
c. Harassment usually occurs when one person engages in abusive behavior or asserts unwarranted power or authority over another, whether intended or not, and may include, for example, name-calling, threats, belittling, unwelcome advances and requests for sexual favors (as well as undue pressure to perform or succeed).
d. Harassment includes child abuse.
e. Child abuse can include physical contact – or the threat of it – that intentionally causes bodily hard or injury to a child. This may include, for example, hitting, shaking, kicking, shoving, and forcing an athlete to train or compete when injured or mandating excessive exercise as a form of punishment. It may also include touching for the purpose of causing sexual arousal or gratification that involves a child, rape, incest, fondling, exhibitionism and sexual exploitation. It may also include chronic attacks on a child’s self-esteem, such a psychologically destruct behavior consisting of ridiculing, screaming, swearing, racist comments, threatening, stalking, hazing and isolating.

The entire US Squash community must work cooperatively to promote an environment that is free of sexual, physical or emotional abuse, harassment, bullying, or hazing in any form.

 1. US Squash will timely respond to any and all allegations of abuse, harassment, bullying or hazing in matters that are within the purview (scope or extent of function, ability, or authority) and jurisdiction of officials or persons at other levels or of other organizations will be timely responded to and dealt as appropriate.

2. US Squash cannot guarantee complete confidentially of complaints. However, US Squash will strive to insure that all complaints are handled in a manner that to the greatest degree possible, protects the rights of all.

 3. When necessary and appropriate, this information will be communicated to the appropriate authorities for investigation and should be reviewed by appropriate officials, with timely notification to the alleged offender of such allegation.

 4. Any person accused of sexual or physical abuse may be asked to resign voluntarily or may be suspended until the matter is investigated and resolv Regardless of criminal or civil guilt in the alleged abuse, the continued presence of the person could be detrimental to the reputation of the organization and could be harmful to the participants. A person who is accused but later cleared of the charged, may apply to have a suspension lifted or, if applicable, to be reinstated within the organization. Reinstatement is not a right, and no assurance is made that the person will be reinstated to his/her former position.

5. Any person or member organization that fails to appropriately report, who makes a false report or who threatens retaliation or reprisal against an individual for reporting sexual, physical or emotional abuse, harassment, bullying, or hazing in any form will be subject to discipline or other action as may be within the purview and jurisdiction of US Squash.

Broadcast Policy

US SQUASH Broadcast Policy

US Squash has been and, in the future, will be entering into agreements with media companies to provide coverage for its various events. There are limitations imposed by these media companies on the spectators at these events, including coach, athlete and volunteer members of US Squash, prohibiting photographing, videotaping and other audio/visual recordings for commercial non-personal use, and broadcasting, publishing and disseminating the product for any and all commercial purposes, and are therefore prohibited without express written permission from US Squash.

Any photographs, videotape or other audio and/or visual recordings of the event created by a spectator may be used solely for such spectator’s personal non- commercial use, and may not be broadcast, published or disseminated, or used for any commercial purposes, without the prior written consent of US Squash.  This policy allows for videotaping, filming, digitally recording and photography for educational and personal purposes, however prohibits others from taping and then attempting to sell or post on other sites.  Use of a photographic or recording device within the court, other than by parties approved by US Squash, is prohibited. Live-streaming videos taken during accredited play is prohibited, including, but not limited to, services such as Youtube, Periscope and Meerkat, unless previously approved by US Squash.
Further Restrictions Applicable in the Case of Minors

Third party photography or recording of participants under the age of 18, other than by those approved by US Squash, is prohibited.  In the case of participants under the age of 18, a participant involved in a match or that participant’s relatives, coach or guardian are permitted to use a photographic or recording device outside of the court. In all instances, US Squash policies related to appropriate use of this content must be followed. In order to reduce the risk of misuse, US Squash does not recommend location-tagging of videos or photos.

This policy, which applies to all accredited competition, inter-relates with other policies and guidelines designed to foster a positive and safe environment for all players, parents, coaches, and spectators. These include, but are not limited to: the US Squash Code of Conduct; the Abuse, Harassment, Bullying and Hazing Policy; and practices espoused by the national SafeSport initiative.

Policies from facilities at which competitions occur may also place additional restrictions beyond those mentioned in this policy.

Examples of the Broadcast Policy applied to regularly occurring situations:

Appropriate Actions and Use:

  • Videotaping one’s own matches to review technique and tactics with the goal of improving one’s own future performance;
  • Photographs or video taken by a parent, player or coach of the players directly involved in the match.
  • Recording matches of personal significance: tournaments or matches of adult players for a personal library of footage;

Inappropriate Actions and Use:

  • Posting of match footage for public viewing online;
  • Third party use of any photographs or video through social media;
  • Any use in connection with disrespectful or bullying comments;
  • A third party requesting permission from parents of an under-18 participant to film a match, or simply filming without permission. This includes a coach, player, or parent of a non-participating player taking scouting footage.
Squash Assembly

Annual US Squash Member’s Open Forum Assembly

Purpose:
There shall be an annual open forum Squash Assembly at which all individual and organization members and other squash constituencies shall gather and provide inquiry of and input to the Board of Directors on important issues involving the organization. The Board shall provide a report on the “State of the Association.” The Chief Executive Officer shall provide a managerial report addressing issues of concern and importance to US Squash.

Individual and organization members and other squash constituencies may pose questions to the Board and Chief Executive Officer for response. The annual Squash Assembly shall be advisory in nature and shall not have rulemaking, budgetary, legislative, or other authority. The Board shall determine the agenda of the annual Squash Assembly. The Annual US Squash Member’s Open Forum Assembly shall be separate from the Annual Meeting of Members provided for in the By-laws.

Place:
The annual Squash Assembly shall be held in conjunction with the regular quarterly meeting of the Board of Directors held in September, October or November of each year. If practicable, the annual Squash Assembly shall also be held in conjunction with a major US Squash competition.

Notice:
Notice of the annual Squash Assembly stating the place, date and time of the Assembly shall be posted on the website of US Squash no fewer than thirty (30) days before the date of the meeting.

The 2016 Assembly will again be held alongside the 2016 Delaware Investments U.S. Open at Drexel University in Philadelphia. The Assembly will take place on Friday, October 14, from 3:00pm – 4:00pm at the Sheraton Hotel University City.

As in years past, the annual election of members to the Board of Directors will take place during the official Annual Meeting of the Members. The Chairman of the Board will also provide a report on the state of the association and the President and CEO will provide a managerial report addressing issues of concern and important to US Squash, and its constituents.

The assembly is free to attend for all members of US Squash. Bringing together members from across the country, the assembly, and Squash Summit which precedes it, aims to facilitate discussions about every aspect of squash, with the intention of improving and bettering the sport and its community.

Protective Eyewear Policy

US SQUASH Protective Eyewear Policy

The risk of eye injury in racquet sports such as squash is “high” according to the American Academies of Ophthalmology and Pediatrics, the American Optometric Association, and eye care professionals who have studied sports eye injuries. Fortunately, these injuries are almost totally preventable with appropriate protective equipment.

  • All players and coaches must wear protective eyewear whether playing singles or doubles, hardball or softball squash during all activities that take place on the court involving racquets and balls at US Squash-only sanctioned events.
  • The eyewear must meet or exceed the current American Society for Testing and Materials standard (ASTM-F803). To be used in competition, protective eyewear must appear on the ASTM reference listing.
  • The eyewear must be unaltered and worn over the eyes as designed at all times.
  • The policy applies to participants at all events in the United States including tournaments, exhibitions, clinics and leagues which are sanctioned only by the US Squash or organized by its member districts.
  • Players under 19 years of age participating in Junior competitions internationally must wear approved eyewear at all times.
  • Members of Team USA (Men and Women) are strongly encouraged to wear protective eyewear while competing in international events.

US Squash will maintain a reference list of ASTM approved eyewear but does not test, evaluate, or certify eyewear as compliant with ASTM-F803.

Selecting protective eyewear that meets or exceeds the ASTM-F803 standard is the responsibility of individual participants. Streetwear spectacles and unlensed eye protection do not meet the standard. In some cases eyewear manufacturers may assert their products are compliant with the standard or the products may carry the seal of an independent certifier such as the Protective Eyewear Certification Council. However, US Squash recommends seeking advice from an eyewear professional before buying to insure that the eyewear meets or exceeds the ASTM-F803 standard.

Download a printable version of the ASTM-F803 Approved Eyewear List

APPROVED

The companies below assert these eyewear models have been tested and meet the ASTM-F803 standard for eye protection. If you have knowledge indicating otherwise, please send an email to office@ussquash.com.

Black Knight Action Eyes Stiletto
Black Knight Action Eyes Turbo
Black Knight Action Eyes Turbo Junior
Black Knight Lasers
Black Knight Sight Guards
Black Knight Kona
Black Knight Kona Junior
Black Knight Lynx
E-Force Crystal Wrap
E-Force Dual Focus
Ektelon Scopa Slim
Ektelon Speed
Ektelon Strobe
Ektelon Strobe 2009
Ektelon Vendetta
Dunlop I-Armor Protective Eyewear
Dunlop I-Armor Junior Eyewear
Gearbox Vision
Harrow Radar
Harrow Banzai
Harrow Shield Pro

HEAD Impulse
HEAD Pro Elite
HEAD Raptor
HEAD Rave
i-MASK, WARNING: For i-MASK users: Polycarbonate spectacle lenses should be used if spectacles are worn under protective eyewear.
Oliver Mirage
Oliver Prolite
Prince Speed
Prince Pro Lite
Prince Pro Lite II
Prince Scopa Slim
Python Rad Turbo Amber/Lens
Python Rad Turbo
Swans Sports Eye Guard
Tecnifibre Absolute Squash
Tourna Specs Clear
Wilson Jet Eyewear
Wilson Lynx
Wilson nVue Eyewear
Wilson Vents Hope Squash

UNAPPROVED

The following eyewear models have NOT been confirmed as having been tested or having met the ASTM-F803 standard for eye protection and are therefore are NOT currently approved for use in order to be compliant with the US. Squash Protective Eyewear Policy. If you have knowledge indicating otherwise, please send an email to office@ussquash.com.

Ektelon Attitude
Ektelon Mirage II
Ektelon More Game
Ektelon Quantum
Feather Eyewear – all models
Harrow Rudy Project – all models
HEAD Master
HEAD PowerZone Shield Junior
HEAD PowerZone Shield
I.X. Power Pro
I.X. Talbot Speed Pro

Oakley – all models
Rudy Project – all models
S&W Eyewear – all models
Vents Eyewear
Vents Junior
Wilson GPS
Wilson Triple X Squash
Wilson Vents Cadet
Wilson Vents Squash Goggles

ASTM International, known until 2001 as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), is an international standards organization that develops and publishes voluntary consensus technical standards for a wide range of materials, products, systems, and services.

The ASTM-F803 specification covers eye protectors, designed for use by players of racket sports, women’s lacrosse, field hockey, basketball, baseball, and soccer that minimize or significantly reduce injury to the eye and adnexa due to impact and penetration by racket-sport rackets and balls, women’s lacrosse and field hockey sticks and balls, baseballs, soccer balls, hands, elbows, and fingers. Protective eyewear offers protection only to the eyes and does not protect other parts of the head.

Decision Review, Dispute Resolution Procedures
Board of Directors and Association Mutual Expectations Policy

US SQUASH Board of Directors and Association Mutual Expectations

You were selected to be a member of the Board of Directors of US Squash because of your commitment to our national community of squash enthusiasts and to this organization. As a Board member, we ask a number of things from you in order to build an effective partnership with you as we work together to achieve our MISSION: “ to enhance people’s health and well being by increasing participation in squash, to enrich the experiences of our members of all ages, and to build awareness of the sport, valuing excellence, professionalism and fiscal responsibility”. We recognize, though, that there is no such thing as an expectation without a corresponding responsibility. What this means is that, in order for our Board to be truly effective, there are some things that we have a responsibility to provide – some things that you can and should expect from us. If we each live up to our commitment, there’s simply no telling what we can accomplish together!

US Squash Association Board members:
-Are passionate about the game of squash and our Association – our Mission and how we work to achieve it, and share this passion by taking an active role in advocating for
US Squash in all of their involvements with the game.
-Have a heartfelt strong desire to make a difference to the game of squash.
-Develop and demonstrate a clear understanding about who we are and what we do, and demonstrate this by actively participating in discussion and debate at Board meetings.
-Understand the goals of US Squash, and how we are going about meeting them.
-Attend in person whenever possible, and when this is not possible participate via telephone conference both of the Board meetings each year.
-Get involved in at least one volunteer opportunity relating to the game of squash beyond the Board.
-Actively engage in building relationships with other Board members beyond theBoardroom.
-Are proud of your involvement with this organization and this community, and demonstrate this by attending US Squash events throughout the year.
-Demonstrate your commitment by financially supporting US Squash to the fullest extent possible.

The Association will:
-Ensure that our Mission is at the heart of everything we do by providing regular updates on the work we do to and its relationship to our organizational priorities.
-Provide you with continuous education about our programs and initiatives through a comprehensive orientation program and a regular educational component at Board meetings.
-Create opportunities for you to fully explore and understand the issues facing our sport by scheduling outside presentations during Board meetings.
-Ensure that Board meetings are engaging and provide opportunities for thoughtful discussion on current and emerging issues.
-Understand your passions in an effort to identify the best volunteer opportunity for you by asking you about your interests and offering you experiences that match them.
-Provide you with unparalleled avenues for developing a rich network of relationships with people from all sectors of the game.
-Welcome and celebrate your involvement in growing squash.

Ethics, Principles and Conflict of Interest Policy

US SQUASH Board Statement of Ethics Principles and Conflict of Interest Policy

Those who serve US Squash, whether as volunteers or paid professionals, are held to the highest standards of conduct. As guardians of squash ideals they assume an obligation to subordinate individual interests to the interests of US Squash. What may be considered acceptable conduct in some businesses may be inappropriate in service to our sport.

Those who serve US Squash must avoid any institutional loss or embarrassment and behave in such a way that the organization’s trust and public confidence are enhanced. It is important to avoid any real conflict of interest as well as the appearance of a conflict of interest.

While no set of guidelines can guarantee acceptable behavior, the principles which guide behavior in this area are (i) disclosure, (ii) physical absence and (iii) nonparticipation in the decision making process where personal or family gain is a possibility and a commitment to honor the confidentiality of organizational information. All conduct is founded on the individual’s own sense of integrity. Any individual accepting the honor of service to US Squash must also accept the burdens of public disclosure and public scrutiny. In our complex society, the intermixture of volunteer work, business interests, governmental activity, and family relationships, inevitability create potentially conflicting interests. What is required is ready disclosure of conflicting interests whenever they arise, as well as physical absence from and strict nonparticipation in any evaluation or decision making process relating to matters in which the individual has a real or apparent conflict of interest.

Compensation Policy

US Squash Chief Executive Officer Compensation Policy

Background

In 2004, the Executive Committee of the United States Squash Racquets Association (US Squash) adopted a plan to upgrade the position of Executive Director to that of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) as part of a broader overall plan to modernize the governance and general operation of our Association as we naturally evolved from our previous “grass roots” management structure and in accordance with broad trends occurring with many other national sports governing bodies.

The creation of the new CEO position was done to accomplish two things: 1) to be able to attract a seasoned general management executive to lead the Association on a path of expansion and growth and 2) to empower that individual to professionalize the Association’s operations by building and managing a professional “in house” staff as opposed to having a cadre of volunteer Board and other non-professional volunteers engaged in what were fundamentally operating functions of the Association. In its essence the plan required the Board to focus on (i) the selection, review, and ongoing oversight of the CEO, (ii) strategy, (iii) fund raising, and, (iv) financial reporting and controls, with the CEO being given full general management leadership responsibility for the Association. Concurrently, the title of President, a volunteer position, was changed to Board Chair, and in 2007, after an extensive governance and bylaw review process, the Board of Directors was reduced to 10 people from 36 and the other “operating titles” previously given to volunteer Board members (Vice President, Treasurer and Secretary) were eliminated. The Board was now formally charged with oversight of the CEO, providing strategic guidance, fundraising, and the oversight of the financial reporting and related financial controls of the Association.

During the initial search for a CEO in 2003, the board retained a search professional who researched salaries at comparable not-for-profits including National Sports Governing Bodies and other sport management organizations in order to establish a compensation package that the Association (i) could afford, (ii) would attract the best possible talent, and (iii) was in line with the compensation packages at other comparable organizations the Association would seek to emulate.

At that time the Board was provided with data from Mercer Human Resources Consulting showing total annual compensation for National Governing Body Executive Director/CEO positions as well comparable Sports Industry Organizations which was used as the basis for the initial salary and bonus structure. A copy of the memo from Mercer is included in Addendum A which also includes a series of memos covering executive compensation since the creation of the new position of CEO as well as copies of all CEO employment agreements since the position was created. These employment agreements have each been for two (2) year time periods.

Subsequently, the Board formed a Compensation Committee comprised of the Board Chair, the Chair of the Finance Committee, and two other Board members. The Compensation Committee has considered annual surveys of compensation levels of comparable executives to ensure the US Squash CEO’s compensation is consistent with the market. For example results from a 2007-2008 ARC Comp Report based on an analysis of over 3, 000 US based association chief staff executives in public/special interest cause associations with $2 million in annual gross revenue (in the case of US Squash, this would include district associations and endowment revenue) shows that the US Squash CEO’s compensation, once adjusted for the cost of living in the New York area, falls within the average range.

Since the hiring of our first CEO, the Board has conducted formal written performance reviews of the CEO at a minimum annually. Each Board member is asked to provide a written evaluation based upon pre-agreed criteria in order to determine these reviews. Each review also includes a review of the executive’s compensation which considered the parameters set forth above. In addition, the Board Chair periodically reviews the CEO’s travel and entertainment reimbursement practices and amounts to insure they are in accordance with customary and reasonable best practices.

Policy

It is the desire of the US Squash Board to attract and retain a dedicated, seasoned general management executive of the highest caliber available to the post of CEO who will be responsible for managing all areas of the Association’s operations.

It is a primary function of the Board of Directors to undertake a formal written annual performance review of the CEO at fiscal year-end which evaluates the CEO’s leadership and job performance in all key areas. It is a key responsibility of each Board member to thoughtfully and diligently participate in the annual performance review process.

The Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee has the responsibility to determine whether or not it will recommend to the entire Board, for its review and consideration, an annual discretionary compensation bonus based on the results of the performance review. The Compensation sub-committee shall consist of the Board Chair, the Chair of the Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee and two other Board members.

In considering whether or not a bonus is warranted, the Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee and Board as a whole will consider whether the Association has met the financial expectations set forth in the annual budget and other pre-agreed upon performance criteria such as membership growth, effective program implementation, improvement, and oversight, known as Key Tactical Indicators.

The anticipated range of the CEO’s discretionary bonus is to be between 5% and 25% of base compensation in years with overall satisfactory job performance and better.

In addition when considering base salary levels and bonus compensation for the CEO, the Compensation Committee and Board will take in to consideration time relevant surveys of compensation levels of comparable executives to ensure the US Squash CEO’s compensation is consistent and competitive with the market.

The Compensation sub-committee will review no less than annually the travel and entertainment documentation practices and amounts to insure that they are within customary and reasonable best practices.

The Chair of the Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee and Board Chair shall together maintain a confidential ongoing standing file to be made available to all Board members upon request containing chronologically all CEO performance reviews and the comparable organization salary and bonus compensation data utilized in making all compensation decisions as well as the results of the periodic reviews of the travel and entertainment reimbursements to the CEO. This standing file will also include copies of all employment agreements and ancillary documents relevant to the CEO’s employment relationship with the Association.

Criteria, Responsibilities, and Commitments of Board Members

Criteria, Responsibilities, and Commitments of Board Members 

Our Board is representative of our membership and consists of leaders in the game of squash from throughout the country. Included on our Board are top ranking players, coaches, local association and national tournament organizers each of whom are passionate for the game and bring to the Board tremendous diversity in their skills and capacities.

In acknowledging the work of our volunteer leaders, the Board recently articulated attributes in our Board members to help focus the nominating process. Key to the process is the need to balance the skill of potential Board members with the organization’s needs.

Fundamental characteristics (or attributes) desired in individual Board members:

-Commitment to the mission and goals of US Squash.
-Willingness to give time and talent.
-Willingness to make a personally significant financial contribution.
-Willingness to ask others to make financial contributions.

Collectively, the individual skills of Board members are a reflection of US Squash, its goals and work process.

To that end it is a desired to build a Board that will be recognized and respected for its:
-Rich diversity and its member’s broad non-profit experience.
-Networks and linkages which can help advance the Association’s key initiatives and fund raising goals.
-Demonstrated executive leadership and respected public stature.
-Experience in working with complex issues and organizations.
-Capacity to listen and embrace change.

Responsibilities of the US Squash Board:
-To represent the members of the US Squash.
-To set the mission for the organization for implementation by CEO.
-To ensure programs and priorities are strategic, effective and mission driven.
-To work with the CEO to secure and develop the resources needed to accomplish objectives.
-To ensure the organization is fiscally sound and conducts its business professionally. To be committed to Board development and effective governance.
-To work with and support the CEO as hired by the Board.

Periodic Board Level Review of Banking Activity

Periodic Board Level Review of Banking Activity

a) The individuals designated as the Board Chair and Finance Chair for the Association shall share responsibility for undertaking periodic sample basis reviews of the banking activity of the Association.
b) The Board Chair and Finance Chair shall be provided with “read or view only” on‐line access to all of the Association’s operating and cash management bank and investment accounts that will include information regarding all deposits, payment authorizations and transfers, and the front and back copy of all cancelled checks, to enable the conduct of such periodic sample basis reviews.
c) At least quarterly the Board Chair and/or Finance Chair shall undertake the review of the bank and investment account statements seeking to determine on a best efforts sample basis that:

a. Deposits are from expected sources (and in the case of those from unexpected sources, determine they are appropriate);
b. Payments are made only by an authorized employee of U.S. Squash in accordance with U.S. Squash policy;
c. Bank transfers are made only to known U.S. Squash bank accounts and recorded on the same date;
d. Wire transfers are duly authorized in accordance with U.S. Squash procedures,
e. In the case of checks:

i. There are no unusual or second endorsements, such as endorsements by employees when the payee is not the employee;
ii. There are no alterations to the check payee or amount such as erasures or possible use of white‐out; and
iii. Checks are made payable to expected vendors (and, in the case of checks made payable to any unexpected vendors, determine they are appropriate).

d) The Board and Finance Chair shall ensure that management is reviewing: (i) the monthly bank reconciliations and investigating any unusual reconciling items; and, (ii) any journal entries to the cash accounts on a timely basis.

II. CEO Cash Disbursement Authorization Policies and Procedures

All salary, bonus and expense reimbursement payments to be made by the Association directly to the CEO shall only be made upon specific written authorization by the Board Chair with disclosure to the full Board. The Board Chair shall periodically (no less than annually) conduct a “sample review” of the expense reimbursement voucher documentation provided by the CEO to the Association in conjunction with expense reimbursements. The CEO may sign checks and/or authorize banking system payments directly to themselves only upon such written authorization by the Board Chair. In the case of payments to be made via the Association’s payroll service to the CEO, the Board Chair will provide written authorizations to the applicable payroll service provider to effectuate all such payments.

The Finance Committee shall review these policies and procedures at least annually to insure that they are up to date and comply with best practices.

Board Statement of Governing Style and Expected Conduct

US SQUASH Board Statement of Governing Style and Expected Conduct

The US Squash Board of Directors, hereafter referred to as the Board, will approach it’s task with a style which emphasizes outward vision rather than an internal preoccupation, encouragement of diversity in viewpoints, strategic leadership more than administrative detail, clear distinction of Board and Staff roles, future rather than past or present, and will strive to be proactive rather than reactive in its endeavors.
In this spirit the Board has a governing style that will:

1 Focus chiefly on intended long term impacts on the world of squash (ends/policy), not on the administrative or programmatic means of attaining those effects.
2 Direct, control, and inspire U. S. Squash through the careful establishment of the broadest organizational values and policies.
3 Enforce upon itself whatever discipline is needed to govern with excellence. Discipline will apply to matters as policy making principles and self-policing of any tendency to stray from governance adopted in Board policies.
4 Be accountable for competent, conscientious and effective accomplishment of it’s obligations as a governing body for squash. It will allow no officer, individual, or committee to usurp this role or hinder this commitment.
5 Review on a regular basis the Board’s process and performance.
6 Be an initiator of policy, not merely a reactor to staff initiatives. The Board, not the staff, will be responsible for the Board’s performance.
7 Work closely with the CEO to help define and prioritize the vision, mission, ends and goals of the membership of the Association.
8 Develop and maintain consistent rules, regulations and policies to ensure fair and safe competition and to accomplish the ends of its members.
9 Facilitate the development of programs that will support the member’s attainment of their goals and contribute to the process of squash as a whole. These programs will be administered by the staff within the constraints of fiscal responsibility.

Further, the Association Board expects of itself and its members ethical and business-like conduct. This commitment includes proper use of authority, appropriate decorum, and discretion in group and individual behavior when acting as Board members.
1. Board members must represent, without any conflict, loyalty to the interest of the Association and our membership. This accountability supersedes any conflicting
loyalty such as that to advocacy or interest groups and membership on other boards or staff.
2. Board members must avoid any conflict of interest with respect to their fiduciary responsibility. Specifically should a Board member be considered for employment, she/he must temporarily withdraw from Board deliberations, voting and access to applicable Board information.
3. Board members may not attempt to exercise individual authority over the USSRA except as explicitly set forth in the bylaws and any duly adopted Board policies:

a. Board member interaction with the Chief Executive Officer or with the staff will recognize the lack of authority in any individual Board member or group of Board members except as noted above.
b. Board members’ interaction with the public, press or other entities must recognize the same limitation and the similar inability of any Board member other than the Chair to speak for the Board. In instances where it is appropriate for them to speak as individuals regarding the affairs of the Association individual Board members must identify that it is their personal opinion they are providing. While it is important for Board member’s to be as accessible as possible to the membership as listeners, as well as key communicators of the Association’s message as it evolves, specific Board deliberations should be treated with discretion.
c. Board members should make no judgments or evaluations of the Chief Executive Officer or staff performance except as that performance is assessed against explicit Board policies by the official review process.

Roles and Responsibility Policy

US Squash Policy Statement of Roles and Responsibilities of the Association’s Volunteer Leadership – Board Chair and the Association’s Professional Staff – CEO and Staff

Chief Volunteer (Board Chair) — Provides Board leadership in expediting the goals of the organization

-Serves as member of the Board and fulfills the expectations of Board members.
-Presides at all Board and membership meetings.
-In circumstances not expressly provided for in the By-laws, appoints Board committees in concert with CEO.
-In circumstances not expressly provided for in the By-laws, is ex-officio member of all
-Board committees and provides guidance to those committees when necessary.
-Is wholly focused on the mission of organization. Acts as spokesperson for the Board.
-Serves as advocate and role model for volunteers of the organization.
-Is senior partner with CEO in seeking fulfillment of the Association’s mission.
-In concert with CEO, sets agenda for Board meetings and facilitates the work of the board in completing agenda.
-Maintains regular communication with CEO to keep informed of organizational activities and emerging activities.
-Communicates with CEO on behalf of Board.
-Leads evaluation of the performance of CEO annually.
-Is an integral participant in the organization’s strategic planning process.
-Ensures that designated roles are adhered to.

CEO – Serves as chief operations executive for the organization responsible for achieving the desired end results as established by the Board.

-Leads the process of translating/implementing the Board’s established mission and goals into long-term strategic and annual operating plan.
-In concert with Board chair, prepares agenda for Board meetings. Attends all Board meetings and committee meetings.
-Communicates regularly and provides needed information to assist the Board in fulfilling its decision-making and monitoring roles.
-Initiates and directs the development of policies for Board approval.
-Develops budget in conjunction with finance committee.
-Empowered to establish operating procedures and decides all matters of administrative and supervisory detail in connection with operation and maintenance of organization.
-Recruits, hires and manages association staff to perform the duties required for the operating functions of the organization.
-Serves as the Association’s primary spokesperson and represents the organization as it’s CEO in all dealings with other organizations, individuals and general public.

Whistleblower Policy

 US Squash Whistleblower Policy

General

The United States Squash Racquets Association, Inc. d/b/a US Squash (“US Squash”) Ethics, Principles and Conflict of Interest Policy (“Ethics Policy”) requires directors, officers and employees to observe high standards of business and personal ethics in the conduct of their duties and responsibilities. As employees and representatives of US Squash, we must practice honesty and integrity in fulfilling our responsibilities and comply with all applicable laws and regulations.

Whistleblowing

Whistleblowing is defined as the act of reporting wrongdoing within the organization to internal US Squash parties.

Reporting Responsibility

It is the responsibility of all directors, officers and employees to comply with the Ethics Policy and to report violations or suspected violations in accordance with this Whistleblower Policy.

No Retaliation

No director, officer or employee who in good faith reports a violation of the Ethics Policy shall suffer harassment, retaliation or adverse employment consequence. An employee who retaliates against someone who has reported a violation in good faith is subject to discipline up to and including termination of employment. This Whistleblower Policy is intended to encourage and enable employees and others to raise serious concerns within US Squash prior to seeking resolution outside US Squash.

Reporting Violations

This Whistleblower Policy intends to highlight US Squash’s open door approach to transparency in all aspects of US Squash business and suggests that employees share their questions, concerns, suggestions or complaints with someone who can address them properly. In most cases, an employee’s

supervisor is in the best position to address an area of concern. However, if you are not comfortable speaking with your supervisor or you are not satisfied with your supervisor’s response, you are encouraged to speak with the CEO or Board Chair. The CEO is required to report suspected violations of the Ethics Policy to U.S. SQUASH’s Compliance Officer, who has specific and exclusive responsibility to investigate all reported violations. For suspected fraud, or when you are not satisfied or uncomfortable with following the Organization’s open door policy, individuals should contact US Squash’s Compliance Officer directly.

Compliance Officer

The US Squash’s Compliance Officer is the Chairperson of the Board of Review. The Organization’s Compliance Officer is responsible for investigating and resolving all reported complaints and allegations concerning violations of the Ethics Policy and, at his or her discretion, shall advise the Board Chair, the CEO and/or the Chairperson of the Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee. The Compliance Officer has direct access to the board of directors and is required to report to the board at least annually on compliance activity.

Accounting and Auditing Matters

The Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee of the board of directors shall address all reported concerns or complaints regarding corporate accounting practices, internal controls or auditing. The Compliance Officer shall notify the Chairperson of the Finance, Audit and Compensation Committee of any such complaint and work with the committee until the matter is resolved.

Acting in Good Faith

Anyone filing a complaint concerning a violation or suspected violation of the Ethics Policy must be acting in good faith and have reasonable grounds for believing the information disclosed indicates a violation of the Ethics Policy. Any allegations that prove not to be substantiated and which prove to have been made maliciously or knowingly to be false will be viewed as a serious disciplinary offense.

Confidentiality

Violations or suspected violations may be submitted on a confidential basis by the complainant or may be submitted anonymously. Reports of violations or suspected violations will be kept confidential to the extent possible, consistent with the need to conduct an adequate investigation.

Handling of Reported Violations

The Compliance Officer will notify the sender and acknowledge receipt of the reported violation or suspected violation within twenty (20) business days. All reports will be investigated according to Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures of the Board of Review and appropriate corrective action according to these Procedures will be taken if warranted by the investigation.

Policy Adopted by the Board of Directors on April 10, 2008. Policy Attribution
Sample Text Provided by the National Council of Nonprofit Associations. Copyright 2004, National Council of Nonprofit Associations, www.ncna.org.

The National Council of Nonprofit Associations (NCNA) is the network of state and regional nonprofit associations serving over 22, 000 members in 46 states and the District of Columbia. NCNA links local organizations to a national audience through state associations and helps small and mid-sized nonprofits: manage and lead more effectively; collaborate and exchange solutions; save money through group buying opportunities; engage in critical policy issues affecting the sector; and achieve greater impact in their communities.

What Is Whistleblowing?

From the CPA Journal Online, A Publication of the New York State Society of CPAs.

In its simplest form, whistleblowing involves the act of reporting wrongdoing within an organization to internal or external parties. Internal whistleblowing entails reporting the information to a source within the organization. External whistleblowing occurs when the whistleblower takes the information outside the organization, such as to the media or regulators.

Whistleblowers have garnered attention due to the worldwide media exposure of recent accounting scandals. In 2002, Time magazine named whistleblowers Cynthia Cooper of WorldCom, Sherron Watkins of Enron, and Coleen Rowley of the FBI as its “Persons of the Year.” While the first two individuals are well known and involve financial scandals, Rowley’s whistleblowing was a noncorporate case but with very serious ramifications involving lapses in the intelligence community in the weeks prior to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Legislative History

The origins of whistleblowing go back well over a century. Some recent significant acts include:

1989 and 1994: The Whistleblower Protection Act. Under the Whistleblower Protection Act, passed in 1989 and amended in 1994, federal employees are protected from workplace retaliation when disclosing waste and fraud. The purpose of the Act and subsequent amendments was to strengthen the protections available to federal employees. Congress has considered reforms that would overhaul the act and enhance protections for federal employees who expose fraudulent activity, waste, and threats to public safety. Such legislation was debated last year, and in 2007, the House of Representatives approved the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act, which overhauls federal whistleblower law.

2002: SOX requirements. In addition to the changing attitude toward whistleblowing, changes in laws and rights related to whistleblowing have followed. SOX provides an example of how publicly traded companies have been required to reshape their businesses and their attitudes toward workplace crime. Sections 806, 301, and 1107 of SOX provide additional guidance for whistleblowing.

Section 806 extends protection to employees of publicly traded companies who report fraud to any federal regulatory or law enforcement agency, any member or committee of Congress, or any person with supervisory authority over the employee. This regulation states that whistleblowers who provide information or assist in an investigation of violations of any federal law relating to fraud against shareholders or any SEC rule or regulation are protected from any form of retaliation by any officer, employee, contractor, subcontractor, or agent of the company. Employees who are retaliated against will be “entitled to all relief necessary to make the employee whole” (SOX section 806), including compensatory damages of back pay, reinstatement of proper position, and compensation for litigation costs, expert witness fees, and attorney fees.

SOX also requires audit committees to take a role in whistleblowing and reducing corporate fraud. Section 301, amending the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, compels audit committees to develop reporting mechanisms for the recording, tracking, and acting on information provided by employees anonymously and confidentially. By mandating policies and protection for reporting wrongdoing, the SOX standards go beyond merely encouraging companies to be more
responsive to employee whistleblowers.

In SOX section 1107, the reach of whistleblowing policies extends beyond public corporations. This section extends protection to any person who reports to a law enforcement officer information related to a violation of a federal law. These whistleblowers are protected from any retaliation by the offender. A violator may be fined and imprisoned for up to 10 years.

Why Implement a Whistleblower Policy?

Consider these important facts from the Association of Certified Fraud
Examiners’ 2006 “Report to the Nation on Occupational Fraud and Abus”:

More than $600 billion in annual losses is attributed to fraud. Anonymous reporting mechanisms are the antifraud measure with the greatest impact on reducing losses: Companies with anonymous reporting mechanisms reported median losses of $100, 000, while those without reported median losses of $200, 000.
Tips from employees, customers, and vendors and anonymous tips account for:
o 34% of the detection of all fraudulent activity;
o 34% of the detection of fraudulent activity for not-for-profit
organizations;
o 39.7% of the detection of fraudulent activity for government agencies; and
o 48% of the detection of owner/executive fraud schemes.

Reporting on internal controls was recommended to the corporate community in the late 1970s, but it took the large scandals (such as Enron) for the SOX legislation to impose such reporting. Recent legislation in California (California’s Nonprofit Integrity Act of 2004) and proposed legislation in other states suggest that nonprofit organizations should consider “best practice” governance policies and mechanisms similar to the provisions of SOX, as doing so may prepare them for future legislative requirements.

IRS data indicate that many nonprofit organizations would be categorized as small businesses. Most small businesses struggle with an appropriate level of segregation of duties, making a whistleblower policy a good mitigating control. A whistleblower policy and effective enforcement has the potential not only to significantly reduce fraudulent activity but also to send a signal to both internal and external constituencies that the organization exercises good corporate governance. Just as corporations must answer to shareholders, universities, government entities, and nonprofit organizations must answer to the public regarding the stewardship of resources.

Code of Conduct

Code of Conduct for Players

Download a printable PDF of the Code of Conduct for Players

Preamble

The integrity of the game is of paramount importance. Being respectful of one’s opponent and the officials, courteous on and off the court, and responsible for one’s own behavior are the fundamentals of competing in a sportsmanlike manner and upholding the integrity of the sport. Squash requires achieving this, while competing in very close quarters with ones opponent, often in situations where the players are physically and mentally pushed to the limit, when the difference between winning and losing fairly, is in the hands and control of each player, regardless of the officials involved.

Competitors must balance many elements which are ultimately in the control of each individual: sportsmanship with the desire to win; courtesy and respect with raw determination; fair play and while testing limits physically and mentally. Preserving the integrity of squash, the true essence of the sport, relies on everyone involved in the game to be courteous, respectful and responsible for his or her own behavior.

Code of Conduct

I therefore pledge to be responsible for my words and actions while participating in US Squash competition and conform my behavior to the following code of conduct:

  1. I will learn and abide by all US Squash Policies and Guidelines and the current Rules of Squash.
  2. I will not engage in unsportsmanlike conduct with any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  3. I will not engage in any behavior which would endanger the health, safety or well-being of any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  4. I will not engage in the use of profanity.
  5. I will treat any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee with respect regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or ability.
  6. I will not engage in verbal or physical threats or abuse aimed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  7. I will not engage in a fight or argue with any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  8. I will respect the officials and their authority during a match and will never question, discuss, or confront players or officials before, during or after a match.

I hereby agree that if I fail to conform my conduct to the foregoing while attending, coaching, officiating or participating in a squash event I will be subject to disciplinary action, including but not limited to the following in any order or combination:

Disciplinary Actions

These disciplinary actions will be imposed in a manner commensurate with the offense and in accordance with the below qualifications of the severity of their disruption or threat.

  1. Verbal warning issued by a league, organization, school official, or US Squash.
  2. Written warning issued by a league, organization, school official, or US Squash.
  3. Suspension or immediate ejection from an event and/or suspension for a period of time ranging from days to weeks, issued by a league, organization or school official who is authorized to issue such suspension or ejection by a school board, youth sports organization, or US Squash.
  4. Suspension from multiple events and/or suspension for a period of time ranging from weeks to months, issued by a league, organization or school official who is authorized to issue such suspension by a school board, youth sports organization, or US Squash.
  5. Season suspension, multiple season suspension, or lifetime suspension, issued by a school board, youth sports organization or US Squash.

Types of Infractions

Minor Infraction

A Minor Infraction will result in penalties and warnings within the rights of a referee during a match and or equal to the disciplinary action 1 or 2 as written above. A Minor Infraction is defined as a single occurrence or disturbance from which no threat has been brought upon any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee though is a violation of the “Player Code of Conduct”. Examples of Minor Infractions include but are not limited to:

  • A single instance of disrespectful language or actions directed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  • A single occurrence of excessive tardiness or absenteeism at which ones presence is obligatory.
  • A single occurrence of non-compliance with the Policies and Guidelines set forth by US Squash.

Major Infraction

A Major Infraction will result in disciplinary actions involving suspension from a single event, multiple events, a season or multiple seasons. A Major Infraction is defined as repeated Minor Infractions or a single occurrence or disturbance of an event in which a threat has been brought upon any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee. These threats or actions if deemed sufficiently damaging to the event or sport gives US Squash or the event organizers the right to immediate action in accordance with any and all disciplinary actions as outlined in the “Player Code of Conduct”. Examples of Major Infractions include but are not limited to:

  • Multiple reported instances of disrespectful language or actions directed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  • A threat or act of violence or assault, sexual or otherwise, against any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
Code of Conduct for Parents, Coaches and Attendees

Download a printable PDF of the Code of Conduct for Parents, Coaches and Attendees

Preamble

Youth sports programs play an important role in promoting the physical, social and emotional development of children. It is therefore essential for parents, coaches and officials to encourage youth athletes to embrace the values of good sportsmanship. Moreover, adults involved in youth sports events should be models of good sportsmanship and should lead by example by demonstrating fairness, respect and self-control.

Code of Conduct

I therefore pledge to be responsible for my words and actions while attending, coaching, officiating or participating in a US Squash event and conform my behavior to the following code of conduct:

  1. I will learn the rules of the squash and abide by all US Squash Policies.
  2. I will not engage, nor encourage my child/player, in unsportsmanlike conduct with any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  3. I will not engage, nor encourage my child/player, in any behavior which would endanger the health, safety or well-being of any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  4. I will not engage, nor encourage my child/player, in the use of profanity.
  5. I will, and encourage my child/player to, treat any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee with respect regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation or ability.
  6. I will not engage, nor encourage my child/player to engage, in verbal or physical threats or abuse aimed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  7. I will not engage, nor encourage my child/player to engage, in a fight or argue with any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  8. I will, and will encourage my child/player to, respect the officials and their authority during a match and will never question, discuss, or confront players or officials before, during or after a match.
  9. I will promote the emotional and physical wellbeing of the athletes ahead of any personal desire I may have for my child to win.

I hereby agree that if I fail to conform my conduct to the foregoing while attending, coaching, officiating or participating in a US Squash event I will be subject to disciplinary action, including but not limited to the following in any order or combination:

Disciplinary Actions

These disciplinary actions will be imposed in a manner commensurate with their offense and in accordance with the below qualifications of the severity of their disruption or threat.

  1. Verbal warning issued by a league, organization, school official, or US Squash.
  2. Written warning issued by a league, organization, school official, or US Squash.
  3. Suspension or immediate ejection from a youth sports event and/or suspension for a period of time ranging from days to weeks, issued by a league, organization or school official who is authorized to issue such suspension or ejection by a school board, youth sports organization, or US Squash.
  4. Suspension from multiple youth sports events and/or suspension for a period of time ranging from weeks to months, issued by a league, organization or school official who is authorized to issue such suspension by a school board, youth sports organization, or US Squash.
  5. Season suspension, multiple season suspension, or lifetime suspension, issued by a school board, youth sports organization or US Squash.

Types of Infractions

Minor Infraction

A Minor Infraction will result in penalties and warnings within the rights of a referee during a match and or equal to the disciplinary action 1 or 2 as written above. A Minor Infraction is defined as a single occurrence or disturbance from which no threat has been brought upon any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee though is a violation of the “Parent, Coach and Attendee Code of Conduct” or the rules of squash as they relate to conduct and etiquette. Examples of Minor Infractions include but are not limited to:

  • A single instance of disrespectful language or actions directed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  • A single occurrence of excessive tardiness or absenteeism for a US Squash event at which ones presence is obligatory.
  • A single occurrence of non-compliance with the policies and rules set forth by US Squash.

Major Infraction

A Major Infraction will result in disciplinary actions involving suspension from a single event, multiple events, a season or multiple seasons. A Major Infraction is defined as repeated minor infraction or a single occurrence or disturbance of an event in which a threat has been brought upon any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee. These threats or actions if deemed sufficiently damaging to the event or sport gives US Squash or the event organizers the right to immediate action in accordance with any and all disciplinary actions as outlined in the “Parent, Coach and Attendee Code of Conduct”. Examples of Major infractions include but are not limited to:

  • Multiple reported instances of disrespectful language or actions directed at any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
  • A threat or act of violence or assault, sexual or otherwise, against any coach, parent, player, participant, official, US Squash staff member or any other attendee.
Misconduct Reporting

Download a printable PDF of the Misconduct Reporting and Response Procedures

Reporting and responding to violations of a U.S. SQUASH Policy, Guideline, Code of Conduct or Rule.

If a Member observes a violation of a U.S. SQUASH Policy, Guideline, Code of Conduct or Rule during a U.S. SQUASH accredited event, he or she is encouraged to report it to an Event Director (if applicable) or U.S. SQUASH staff member if available. Event Directors will then take appropriate action at that time, and in addition may in their discretion complete and file an Incident Report with U.S. SQUASH.
Should an Incident Report be filed with U.S. SQUASH, the CEO and staff may impose the appropriate disciplinary action and in such a case communicate with all parties involved in the incident. In certain circumstances, the applicable portions of the U.S. SQUASH Decision Review, Dispute Resolution, and Rule Clarification Procedures and Board of Review Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be utilized.

Incident Report Form

Exceptional Sportsmanship Reporting

While it is important to identify violators of the Code of Conduct, it is equally important to identify players who exhibit exceptional sportsmanship and the ideals of the Code of Conduct.  If you witness a player exhibiting exceptional sportsmanship at a tournament, let US Squash know about it! If you have seen a player who has acted in an admirable way during accredited matches, please share the moment with US Squash.

Exceptional Sportsmanship Form

Junior Squash

Accredited Junior Tournament Policies
Rules of the Road for Junior Squash
Junior Squash FAQ’s
Middle School and High School Squash
High School All-American Criteria